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News of the day (May 22, 2007)


 Intel & ST together for flash memory
  Posted on 1179870408 by Nicolas

DollarsIntel, STMicroelectronics and Francisco Partners, specialized in investments in technology, announced to have entered into a definitive agreement to create a new independent semiconductor company from the key assets of businesses which last year generated approximately $3.6 billion in combined annual revenue.

The new company will combine key research and development and, because of its size, will probably have more weight on the market.

This announcement isn't big surprise at least for Intel. It is well-known that the manufacturer Flash memory division is facing some serious difficulties compared to the results of the group. Intel will control 45.1% of the joint company and ST, who wanted for quite some time to change its position on the market, 48.6%. The remaining 6.3% will be owned by Francisco Partners who has negotiated the possibility to adjust this percentage in certain circumstances. The new company has received firm commitments for a $1.3 billion term loan from a consortium of banks. If it is undeniable that this type of operation is often good for profits, it is also the opportunity to sack some of the employees assigned to the new company more discreetly.



 Kingston: DDR2-800 certified in 3-3-3-10
  Posted on 1179867664 by Nicolas

Kingston has unveiled two new DDR2-800 / PC2-6400 memory modules named HyperX Ultra Low-Latency of 512MB and 1GB. They are certified to function with timings of 3-3-3-10 and 2.3-2.35 Volts. The voltage required is quite high but the memory module comes with a life warranty. To compare, in our recent memory survey, only two modules produced by G.Skill sustained 400 MHz with aggressive latencies of 3-3-3-8 and 2.45 Volts. Announced as being immediately available in the US, the memory MSRP is $69 for 512MB and $128 for GB. For the 1GB or 1 GB sets, you will have to spend $128 and $255.



 The end of NetBurst
  Posted on 1179865623 by Nicolas

The Netburst Architecture introduced by Intel in November 2006 with the Pentium 4 1.4 & 1.5 GHz is living the last months of its life. According to the documents produced by the Californian giant, the market share hold by the desktop NetBurst processors should be around 2.5% in Q3 and almost equals to zero in the next quarter (unless if there is an exceptional order). We remind you that this type of processors has already left laptop computers. The transition for server is, as often, slower and longer and there will still be some Xeon DP and MP up until the first quarter 2008. Here again, though, the inexorable erosion of sales compared to the Woodcrest and Tigerton will lead to their total disappearance around the end of the second quarter.

Apart from the Northwood episode, we will not really regret the Netburst. In our minds, this architecture will always be associated with the attempt to impose the expensive Rambus memory followed by a late transition to DDR and high frequencies that weren't always synonymous with performances but rather with high thermal dissipation.



 A look into dead pixels
  Posted on 1179849100 by Vincent

Manufacturers’ dead pixel policies have changed, sometimes for the better, other times for the worse. Most of the time, they have simplified their policies. Here they are from A for Acer to V for ViewSonic. If you hesitate between two monitors, two brands, the dead pixel warranty can and will maybe make the difference.

This time, we went even further in the study and asked the question of the number of concerned by this problem of dead pixels. Here are the answers of each manufacturer and the responses of a major on-line retailer, whom we promised confidentiality.

> A look into dead pixels- 2007


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